The culture war between doctors and midwives, explained

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  • Published on:  Tuesday, May 29, 2018
  • A deeper look at history explains why when it comes to midwife use, the US falls behind other affluent countries.Read more in ProPublica's story here:https://www.propublica.org/article/mi...And catch their latest in maternal mortality reporting here: https://www.propublica.org/series/los...Despite spending more per capita on health care than any other country, the U.S. has the highest rate of deaths related to pregnancy and childbirth in the industrialized world. But what makes maternal healthcare in other affluent countries look so different than the U.S.? Among other things, midwives. Midwives in the U.S. participate in less than 10 percent of births. But in Sweden, Denmark and France, they lead around three quarters of deliveries. In Great Britain, they deliver half of all babies, including all three of Kate Middleton’s. So if the midwifery model works for royal babies, why not our own? Check out the video above to find out how midwives have been at the center of a culture war that’s deeply rooted in race and class in America. Subscribe to the ProPublica newsletter: http://go.propublica.org/weeklySubscribe to our channel! http://goo.gl/0bsAjOIn our Vox+ProPublica collaboration, we create deep-dive, investigative video storytelling fueled by ProPublica's reporting. You can read the reporting at https://www.propublica.org, and watch the rest of the series on YouTube at http://bit.ly/2wfVG5Z.Vox.com is a news website that helps you cut through the noise and understand what's really driving the events in the headlines. Check out http://www.vox.com Check out our full video catalog: http://goo.gl/IZONyEFollow Vox on Twitter: http://goo.gl/XFrZ5HOr on Facebook: http://goo.gl/U2g06o
  • Source: https://youtu.be/SE34K88LUek
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Comment

  • Vox

     1 years ago

    In the UK, midwives deliver half of all babies. Compare that to the US where midwives attend only around 10% of births, and maternal and infant mortality rates are much higher. Could a larger role for midwives improve health outcomes? Read more: http://bit.ly/2IYSvVw

  • sk'mo

     2 months ago

    Know what else those other nations have? Public healthcare.While midwifery can be a valuable resource, it is likely to have less of an impact than access to basic medical care throughout maternity.I would also disagree with the presentation of midwifery in Canada. Midwives aren't used all that much. In cases of high-risk pregnancies, midwives are more likely to refer mothers to an ob. From personal experience in Manitoba, when my wife had preeclampsia, we were visited by a Public Health Nurse who c...

  • eskualerritar

     2 months ago

    I fear that your estimation is overestimated because you didn't take into account other confounding factors such as overworked professionals or overall inefficiency of American hospitals. The basis of your argument is ecological data with data not systematically chosen, downgrading this to the levels of evidence of the past century. I won't disagree on the topic that promoting midwifery is an important step in making healthcare more accessible, safe and sustainable, but it appears to me that you're a...

  • Rachel Campbell

     1 years ago

    While I enjoyed this video, I feel that the comparison between maternal mortality rates in America, and countries like Sweden and Denmark was misleading. This video seemed to insinuate that the reason America has a higher maternal mortality rate is because of their lack of midwives. Correlation does not equal causation. There are a lot of other factors, and reasons why countries like Sweden and Denmark may have lower maternal mortality rates, the most obvious being their free and widely accessible heal...

  • Son Valte

     19 days ago

    That just to show that using or not usinh midwives doesn't effect that much.

  • Meg Ballard

     3 months ago

    @Cerulean Skigh in the US especially in rural areas, family practice doctors are trained to deal with the needs of children, adults, and reproductive health. Internal medicine physicians are trained more intensively in specifics relating to general health and some time hospital care of adults only. In the US medical training, OBGYN is considered a surgical specialty. This is sort of why hospitals or group practices that include both midwives and OB-GYNs in the care of patients is ideal. Most women don...

  • Wrath Is Me

     1 years ago

    *I think you need to look at our terrible healthcare system for the maternal mortality rate, not the rate of midwifes.*

  • w/ e

     3 months ago

    Wrath Is Me midwives offer better healthcare to women lol

  • Al Barleta

     1 years ago

    What happens when a hospital runs out of labor and delivery nurses?They have a mid-wife crisis

  • Mae Midwife

     4 months ago

    I think so. :")

  •  4 months ago

    NOOOOOOOOOOO!!!!!!!!😱😱😱😱😱😱😱

  • Science with Katie

     1 years ago

    This was really interesting to watch - I didn’t even know this was an issue, it’s just so common to have a midwife when having a baby in the UK.

  • Dalai Mami

     1 years ago

    Ms Articulate we do have midwives in the states.

  • Jacob Springall

     1 years ago

    Science with Katie I was surprised that the rate was as low as 50%. I just assumed all births were done with a midwife unless there were complications or a C-section was done.

  • Grimm

     1 years ago

    Attributing the US's higher maternal mortality rate to the use of doctors instead of midwives is very misleading. It ignores the vastly different healthcare systems, overall, between the US, UK, France, Sweden, and Denmark. There is no information in this video that supports or refutes the argument that either doctors or midwives improve infant or maternal health.Talking about the history of midwives in the US and its intersection of race and gender is interesting from a historical perspective but do...

  • Coco s

     4 months ago

    That data point isn't about trying to say Drs are bad midwives are good. It's about dispelling the common myth in the US that OBs are the only safe way to give birth. Many people have bought into the idea that you are much better off and extremely safe in a hospital with OBs when that isn't true. Our problems aren't just a lack of socialized medicine. The extreme amount of unnecessary intervention and 1in3 csection rate plays a huge role

  • Noah Henderson

     4 months ago

    Vox like any other organization manipulated data and information in any way it could to support it's agenda. Nothing new here for Vox. They may look professional and push for changes that are important, but are not true vouchers for science.

  • Lu Peters

     1 years ago

    In Germany doctors are not permitted to do births without the assistance of a midwife. Also a doctor is prohibited from giving orders to a midwife regarding birth. That said, if course both usually work in a team for the best result possible.

  • Lorianne Reyes

     a months ago

    Anna F. I’m a doctor and now becoming a midwife. Doctors are not needed in normal low-risk deliveries. Ob/gyns are trained to look for and treat complications of pregnancy. Of course they can deliver in normal pregnancies, but is not what they were meant for. Also, midwives cover a vast field that extends from breastfeeding to parenting preferences; midwives go beyond the delivery and advocate for women’s privacy, preferences, and comfort; they have a closer and personalized approach, and experience...

  • Lazy Mochi

     3 months ago

    Anna F. Well I assume it’s because the midwives are doctors that are there to be there medically and emotionally for the mom so, when there’s a doctor that doesn’t know the patient the midwife knows what she’s doing and doesn’t need someone else giving her orders

  • Curiosity Culture

     1 years ago

    When I first heard about midwives, I had to google it. Living in America, I rarely hear or talk to people with that occupation.

  • NutLover360

     9 months ago

    Poo in the loo

  • kakashihatake454

     1 years ago

    Isn’t it a bit inappropriate to correlate a lack of midwifery to premature births, neonatal mortality and c sections? Whilst there is probably a benefit to having midwifes involved in pregnancy, there’s a multitude of other lifestyle, genetic and environmental factors that contribute more to those three medical occurrences. Vox should have mention the other factors because otherwise you could just assume from that info that midwifery reduces those things, a statement that may be well correlated but wit...

  • André Pettersson

     1 years ago

    It also completely ignores the amount of c-sections performed in the us compared to europe.A procedure that could well influence mortality rates.

  • Nelson Thangjam

     1 years ago

    Read the article linked in the video description, please.

  • madeline mello

     1 years ago

    Why didn't they mention the lack of insurance coverage for midwives?! That's the main reason people can't get a midwife, because it isn't covered by insurance so it's super expensive.

  • madeline mello

     1 years ago

    Midwifes only take low risk pregnancies and all the midwifes I know are very qualified, but I am only familiar with the US system

  • Kat Showalter

     1 years ago

    Some midwifes are covered, especially Nurse Midwives (what the european people in the thread are talking about). Certified Professional Midwifes have max 2 years training and can be very shady. in the Mindy Kaling clip in the video they were confronting CPMs. They can have a bad rap for a reason. There is a really low level of scientific training. Hence why there is less coverage.